Guía Docente 2019-20
ECONOMÍA MUNDIAL Y ESPAÑOLA

BASIC DETAILS:

Subject: ECONOMÍA MUNDIAL Y ESPAÑOLA
Id.: 30401
Programme: GRADUADO EN ADMINISTRACIÓN Y DIRECCIÓN DE EMPRESAS (BOE 26/11/2010)
Module: ECONOMIA Y MARCO JURIDICO
Subject type: MATERIA BASICA
Year: 1 Teaching period: Segundo Cuatrimestre
Credits: 6 Total hours: 150
Classroom activities: 70 Individual study: 80
Main teaching language: Inglés Secondary teaching language: Castellano
Lecturer: Email:

PRESENTATION:

A proper understanding of economics requires historical perspective. Therefore, Spanish and Global Economic is the study of the long-term development of economies. The rationalist structure of modern economic theory is a powerful explanatory tool and is of universal significance – but the importance of the institutional context is often overlooked. If the reality of scarcity, the exercise of choice and the inescapable nature of opportunity cost are timeless and universal, the social mechanisms, laws, conventions and institutions within which individual and collective choices are made evolve continuously.

The subject Spanish and Global Economic enables students to develop a fuller appreciation of the forces of economic change. It balances the ‘universalist’ assumptions of the economist with the ‘particularist’ approach of the historian and helps those who have had little previous acquaintance with economics to understand economic theories through the study of historical examples. Thus, students will be better able to use economic theory and to assess economic policy in ways that take into consideration the differing time paths of legal, political and cultural inheritance. 

PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCES ACQUIRED IN THE SUBJECT:

General programme competences G01 Ability to analyse and summarise information from several sources.
G03 Ability to organise and plan the work in the context of continuous improvement
G04 Use of information and communication technologies
G05 Ability to work effectively in interdisciplinary teams, integrating and participating in scientific and professional teamwork, contributing ideas and respecting and valuing the diversity of views of other team members.
G07 Ability to work in an international context and innovate and adopt new approaches used in other national contexts.
G08 Oral and written communication in Spanish.
G09 Oral and written communication in English in academic and professional contexts.
G10 Ability to apply the acquired knowledge, adapting it to the needs and special features of each situation and person.
Specific programme competences E02 Know and understand the local, national and international socio-economic context in which the companies operate and be able to interpret its impact on them.
E03 Ability to apply the acquired knowledge of the functional areas of the company and the socio-economic environment.
E04 Ability to identify related variables and understand their impact on business organisations.
Learning outcomes R1 Understand the main economic issues related to the foreign sector, as well as major organisms in the international economy
R2 Analyse the main economic variables
R3 Know about the characteristics of the productive sectors in Spain
R4 Analyse, at a basic level, the factors associated with economic growth
R5 Understand the main economic phases that the Spanish and world economy since the have experienced since late nineteenth century to the present day

PRE-REQUISITES:

There are no pre-requisites to follow the course successfully. Nevertheless, it would be desirable if students were familiar with basic kwnoledge of Global Contemporary History, Economics and Geography.

SUBJECT PROGRAMME:

Subject contents:

1 - PRE-INDUSTRIAL ECONOMIES AND THE BEGINNING OF MODERN ECONOMIC GROWTH
    1.1 - The general characteristics of pre-industrial economies.
    1.2 - The crisis of the Old Regime and institutional change.
    1.3 - The Spanish Case
2 - THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION AND THE GROWTH OF INDUSTRIALIZACION
    2.1 - The Industrial Revolution in Great Britain
    2.2 - Industrialization and economic Growth
    2.3 - The Second Industrial Revolution and the emergence of new economic powers.
    2.4 - The Spanish Case
3 - CONFIGURATION OF AN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY: THE FIRST GLOBALIZATION
    3.1 - International trade and the integration of product markets
    3.2 - International capital movements and the international monetary system: the gold standard.
    3.3 - The other side of globalization: crisis in the end of the century and imperialism
    3.4 - The Spanish Case
4 - THE GLOBAL ECONOMY IN THE INTERWAR PERIOD: CRISIS AND DEGLOBALIZATION
    4.1 - The economic consequences of the First World War.
    4.2 - The origins of the Great Depression and its international impact.
    4.3 - The outflows of depression and economic evolution until World War II.
    4.4 - The Spanish Case
5 - THE GOLDEN AGE OF CAPITALISM: GROWTH AND RETURN TO THE INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY
    5.1 - The new economic bases after the Second World War: the role of the State
    5.2 - The reintegration of the international economy: trade, finance and the process of European integration.
    5.3 - Convergence and divergence in the Golden Age of Capitalism
    5.4 - The Spanish Case
6 - THE WORLD ECONOMY DURING THE SECOND GLOBALIZATION: FROM THE CRISIS TO THE THIRD INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION
    6.1 - The limits of economic growth
    6.2 - Economic and financial crises. Changes in economic policies.
    6.3 - New processes of convergence and divergence: the leading role of emerging economies
    6.4 - The Spanish Case

Subject planning could be modified due unforeseen circumstances (group performance, availability of resources, changes to academic calendar etc.) and should not, therefore, be considered to be definitive.


TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODOLOGIES AND ACTIVITIES:

Teaching and learning methodologies and activities applied:

Teaching methods try to be varied, so that students in a classroom can receive a certain range, digest, master the material provided by professor as efficiently and effectively as possible.  Knowing the type of student learning helps teachers to be able to close all or nearly all students by simply convey information by the different styles that are tailored to the type of learning student (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, tactile, mixed…)

Lectures

The professor will develop an analitycal conceptualization and a synthesis for every topic in the program. The aim is to facilitate the transmission of knowledge and to motivate the student in historical and economical analysis.  The focus falls on presentation of information and analysis by the teacher. Lectures offer a good way of covering a lot of information and of conveying ideas to the students.

Tutorials, teamwork practical activities and individual assignment

Tutorials intend to help students to gain a deep understanding of the subject matter in their discipline - discussion in tutorials helps students to see the significance and implications of their knowledge so they can apply what they have learned in new contexts;   enable students to learn how to think, for instance to synthesize disparate sources, to formulate a thesis and justify it, to anticipate criticisms of their arguments, and to respond to questions and challenges;develop students’ basic academic skills (e.g. identification and evaluation of relevant resources, effective communication both orally and in writing, effective time-management, critical self-assessment); develop students’ ability to think and act like a professional in their discipline.

A large proportion of the most meaningful learning at University happens when students are working in small groups, be it in seminars, tutorials, practical and laboratories, as well as with their peers outside their timetabled sessions (independent study time). Working in small teams can allow students to embrace a range of interactive, cohesion with their peers and collaborative skills which are often hard to develop in individual study situations, and impossible to develop in large-group environments such as lectures. These give students the chance to go deeper with the material to put the knowledge they’ve acquired to use or create something new from it. This level of application is an extremely important and often overlooked part of the learning process.

Individual study and reading assignment  allows to use to the teacher numerous methodologies to deepen in the concepts and processes analyzed in class: lecture plus question and answer methods and tasks (combination of lectures with question and answer and administration tasks); lectures plus discussions and assignments  (first teacher describes the subject matter, then hold a discussion, and finally gave the task); global method  (students are told to read the whole material, then students resumed the essence of the material); problem solving method where students are given the questions, then asked to solve, etc.

Business Lab

The purpose of the Business Lab is to introduce students, from day one of their time in ADE, to the real world of business by working on identifying issues, creating solutions, developing contingency plans and applying their solutions to these real problems of working businesses. These activities will have the ultimate purpose of developing students´ social and technical skills, their performance and providing them with a competitive advantage when faced with the labour market.

The activities will be very varied and will range from case work, visiting companies to attending seminars and helping to provide solutions to real business problems. Students will have to attend a number of pre-planned activities that will be developed through the course year. Attendance will be required of all students in all activities planned for them and follow up, as well as grading of the activities, will be done by the students tutor, teacher and the Company representative they will work for. The grading will correspond to a 15% of the mark of the subjects assessed. Failure to attend all of these activities will carry a penalisation determined by the tutor and/ or teacher and reflected in the final mark.

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In accordance with the Manual of Good Practices of the University, it will be considered as a very serious fault the commission of plagiarism in any of the works carried out, as it violates the code of conduct of any profession. In the classroom, unless expressly mentioned by the teacher and those provided by the University, electronic devices that disturb the attention and the correct development of the subject will not be allowed in class

Student work load:

Teaching mode Teaching methods Estimated hours
Classroom activities
Master classes 13
Other theory activities 4
Practical exercises 12
Practical work, exercises, problem-solving etc. 13
Debates 8
Coursework presentations 8
Films, videos, documentaries etc. 4
Workshops 6
Extra-curricular activities (visits, conferences, etc.) 2
Individual study
Tutorials 4
Individual study 22
Individual coursework preparation 12
Group cousework preparation 18
Research work 12
Compulsory reading 10
Recommended reading 2
Total hours: 150

ASSESSMENT SCHEME:

Calculation of final mark:

Written tests: 10 %
Individual coursework: 10 %
Group coursework: 20 %
Final exam: 45 %
Group case work Business Lab: 15 %
TOTAL 100 %

*Las observaciones específicas sobre el sistema de evaluación serán comunicadas por escrito a los alumnos al inicio de la materia.

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND DOCUMENTATION:

Basic bibliography:

FLOUD, R., HUMPHRIES , J., JOHNSON, P. A., eds. The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014.
MORKYR, J. dir. The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2003.
NEAL, Larry. A concise economic history of the world : from paleolithic times to the present. New York-Oxford: Oxford University Press,
BATEN, Joerg (ed.). A history of the global economy : from 1500 to the present. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016.
ALLEN, Robert C. Global economic history : a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.
AMATORI, Franco & COLLI, Andrea. Business history : complexities and comparisons. London & New York: Routledge, 2011.
TAMAMES, Ramón. Estructura económica internacional. Madrid: Alianza editorial, 1970.
GARCÍA DELGADO, José Luis y Myro Rafael (dir). Lecciones de Economía Española. Madrid: Civitas, 2009.
MANKIW, N. Gregory. Economics. London: South- Western, Cengage learning, 2011.
KRUGMAN, Paul R. Essentials of economics. New York: Worth Publishers, 2014.

Recommended bibliography:

TEICHOVA, Alice; MATIS, Herbert. Nation, State and the Economy in History, Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2003. Base de datos: eBook Collection (EBSCOhost)
CROUZET, François. A History of the European Economy, 1000-2000. Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2001. Base de datos: eBook Collection (EBSCOhost)
ALDCROFT, Derek, The European Economy, 1914-1990. London: Routledg, 1993.
BROADBERRY, Stephen & O'ROURKE, Kevin (eds.). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
FEINSTEIN, C.; TEMIN, P. & TONIOLO, G.: The World Economy Between the World Wars. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2008.
LIVI BACCI, Massimo. A Concise history of world population. Malden, Blackwell, 2001.
O'ROURKE, Kevin & WILLIAMSON, Jeffrey G. Globalization and history : the evolution of a nineteenth-century Atlantic economy. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1999.
PERSSON, Karl Gunnar. An Economic History of Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
TEMIN, Peter. Lessons from the Great Depression. Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1989.
DI VITTORIO, Antonio (ed.). An Economic History of Europe. London: Routledge, 2006.
WILLIAMSON, J. G. Comercio y pobreza. Cuándo y cómo comenzó el atraso del Tercer Mundo, Barcelona, Crítica, 2012.
WILLIAMSON, J. G. El desarrollo económico mundial en perspectiva histórica. Cinco siglos de revoluciones industriales, globalización y desigualdad, Zaragoza, Prensas Universitarias de Zaragoza, 2012.
TORTELLA, G. La revolución del siglo XX. Capitalismo, Comunismo y Democracia, Madrid, Taurus, 2000.
CARRERAS, Albert. Historia económica de la España contemporánea (1789-2009), Barcelona: Crítica, 2010.
MASSA, P.; BRACCO, G.; GUENZI, A.; DAVIS, J. A. & CARRERAS, A. Historia económica de Europa, siglos XV-XX, Barcelona: Critica, 2003.
EICHENGREEN, B. La globalización del capital: historia del sistema monetario internacional, Barcelona, Antoni Bosch editor, 2000.
VRIES, J. de. La revolución industriosa. Consumo y economía doméstica desde 1650 hasta el presente, Barcelona: Crítica, 2009.
BROADBERRY, S. & O'ROURKE, K. (eds.). The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe, 2 vols., Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
VAN ZANDEN, J. L., BATEN, J., MIRA D?ERCOLE, M., RIJPMA, A., SMITH, C. y TIMMER, M. (ed.). How Was Life? Global Well-being since 1820, OECD Publishing, 2014. http:/ / www.oecd-ilibrary.org/ economics/ how-was-life_9789264214262-en
TORTELLA, G. The Development of Modern Spain. An Economic History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century, Harvard University Press, 2000.

Recommended websites:

FAOSTAT http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/
Maddison Project http://www.ggdc.net/maddison/maddison-project/home.htm
International Economic History Association http://cs.muohio.edu
European Society for the History of Economic Thought http://www.eshet-web.org
European Historical Economic Society http://www.eh.net
History of de European Union http://europa.eu.int
History full texts http://www.fordham.edu
Economic Journals on the Web http://www.oswego.edu
Pupulation and Health Data http://www.worldpop.org
NBER Macrohistory Database http://www.nber.org
IDB. International Data Base USA http://www.census.gov
Global Financial Data http://www.globalfindata.com
Eurostat http://europa.eu.int
Statistics Historical http://www.neha.nl
Economic History Services www.eh.net
Data and stadistics. A guide to Major Sources on the Web www.lib.rochester.edu


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